Month: September 2020

Appalachian State University Source: Google Earth A student attending Appalachian State University died after developing complications from the coronavirus, university officials announced on Tuesday.  Chad Dorrill was attending classes online and living off-campus in Boone, North Carolina, according to a statement from Appalachian State University Chancellor Sheri Everts. The 19-year-old was diagnosed with the coronavirus earlier
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DivvyDose Source: DivvyDose UnitedHealth Group, the United States’ largest health insurer, has acquired DivvyDose, a start-up that helps patients with chronic illness get their medicines delivered in pre-sorted packages, according to a person familiar with the deal. The deal price was just over $300 million, the person said. They asked not to be named discussing
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 29 2020 Girls – but not boys – who participate actively in school sports activities in middle childhood show improved behavior and attentiveness in early adolescence, suggests a new Canadian study published in Preventative Medicine. Girls who do regular extracurricular sports between ages 6 and 10 show fewer symptoms of
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 29 2020 Scientists have built a computer ‘brain circuit’, or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases, a new study published today in eLife reports. The model identifies a potential mechanism for the impaired decision making that
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A municipal worker sanitizes a Roman Catholic Church graveyard after the burial of Covid-19 coronavirus infected people in Ranchi on September 6, 2020. AFP | Getty Images The coronavirus has killed at least 1 million people across the globe, a nightmarish milestone in the world’s fight against the virus that emerged from Wuhan, China, late
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 28 2020 A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why. When nerve cells aren’t busy exchanging information, they’re supposed to keep quiet. If they’re just popping off at random, like in a noisy classroom,
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Members of the American Red Cross remove influenza victims in 1918. St. Louis Post-Dispatch | Tribune News Service via Getty Images In less than nine months, the coronavirus has quickly spread to more than 33 million people across the globe, killing more than 1 million and becoming the third-leading cause of death in the United
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 28 2020 Following two decades of research on a group of rare diseases called hypereosinophilic syndrome at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug Nucala (mepolizumab) for use in the treatment of patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome. Hypereosinophilic syndrome, also known as HES,
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Courtesy UCSF For seven years, Dr. Ethan Weiss, a cardiologist at The University of California, San Francisco, has experimented with intermittent fasting. The health fad, which restricts eating to specific periods of time, hit the mainstream after a series of promising studies in mice suggested that it might be an effective weight loss strategy in humans. 
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 28 2020 The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) today announced the publication of new NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma. Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most curable forms of pediatric cancer, with long-term survival rates of 90% or higher . However, treatment can
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Antarctica Flights operates 12-hour sightseeing tours over the continent that take off and land on the same day. Courtesy of Antarctica Flights The coronavirus has ravaged the world now for nine months, with people across the globe enduring lockdowns of varying intensities, workplace and school shutdowns and restrictions on group gatherings.  Yet there’s still one continent
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 23 2020 For Laura Stoutingburg and her family, Halloween has always been a monthlong celebration of corn mazes, pumpkin patches and, of course, trick-or-treating in their suburban Denver neighborhood. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced the mother of two to change their plans. “Traditional trick-or-treating house to house does not
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 26 2020 Criticisms of COVID-19 models by Democratic elites in May 2020 appeared to undermine public support for the models’ use – and trust in science more broadly – according to a series of survey experiments conducted with the participation of more than 6,000 Americans. However, whether Republican elites criticized
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 25 2020 New research from the University of Sydney finds that even low levels of alcohol consumption during pregnancy can have an impact on a child’s brain development and is associated with greater psychological and behavioral problems in youth including anxiety, depression and poor attention. Published today in the prestigious
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 24 2020 Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children’s Health indicates. The finding, published online this month in the Archives of
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Jacqueline Dunlap places whole blood samples into a centrifuge to separate plasma for antibody testing at the Bloodworks Northwest Laboratory during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Renton, Washington, September 9, 2020. Lindsey Wasson | Reuters Fewer than 1 in 10 Americans showed signs of a prior coronavirus infection as of late July, suggesting that
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 25 2020 A new drug offers hope for young boys with the progressive neuromuscular disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by potentially offering an alternative to high-dose glucocorticoids that have significant side effects. Interim results from a 24-month clinical trial at Duke Health and other institutions suggest that the drug, vamorolone,
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 26 2020 A novel mobile health program created in early 2018 by the Kraft Center for Community Health at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has proven to be an effective model for bringing opioid addiction treatment services directly to marginalized individuals, particularly the homeless, a population that faces the highest risk
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