Children

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 24 2020 A new paper from the Department of Psychiatry and the Population Health program at University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center, proposes a framework for eliminating defects in behavioral health treatment. Entitled “Eliminating Defects in Behavioral Health Treatment,” the paper was published online on Nov. 19 in the journal
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 25 2020 expectancyA team that includes UCLA Fielding School of Public Health researchers has found American children whose educations have been disrupted by the pandemic, even as little as 2-4 months, may face shortened life spans. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States has extracted an enormous sacrifice from its
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 24 2020 A recent study evaluating the use of force by police against children found that Black and Hispanic adolescents are significantly more likely to die from shootings related to police intervention compared to non-Hispanic white adolescents. The findings, led by Children’s National Hospital researchers and reported online Nov. 24
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 24 2020 In the most comprehensive analysis to date of U.S. children tested and treated for COVID-19, an organization representing seven of the nation’s largest pediatric medical centers reports that some groups of children are faring significantly worse than children in general during the pandemic. Findings from the PEDSnet organization–which
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 20 2020 Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine, have been awarded a five-year, $8.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to further illuminate the
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 20 2020 Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Zokinvy (lonafarnib) capsules to reduce the risk of death due to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and for the treatment of certain processing-deficient progeroid laminopathies in patients one year of age and older. Zokinvy is not approved for use in patients with
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 18 2020 Researchers at the VISTA Center (Vision, Image, Speech and Text Analytics) at the USC Viterbi Information Sciences Institute (ISI) along with scholars at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have discovered strong correlations between facial morphology and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH),
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 20 2020 The results gained in a study involving approximately one million Danish children increase the understanding of how socio-economic differences in childhood affect the development of mental disorders in the Nordic countries. Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Aarhus University and the University of Manchester have investigated the link
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 19 2020 When young people act out sexually in ways that are harmful to others or themselves, the stigma surrounding the issue can be paralyzing for everyone affected. However, data shows that treatment for problematic sexual behavior in youth is highly effective. Faculty members at the University of Oklahoma Health
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 20 2020 Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Aarhus University and the University of Manchester have investigated the link between the socio-economic position of parents and the risk of children developing mental disorders later in life. As research data, the project employed a cohort of roughly one million Danish children
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 20 2020 In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Lei Zhang, Tiewei Lv, Xiaoyan Liu, Chuan Feng, Min Zheng, Jie Tian and Huichao Sun from the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China and the Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Chongqing, China consider a case of pediatric
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 19 2020 A UC Davis Health pediatric team presented a powerful case series of three teenagers who had unexplained breathing problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. The series highlighted the similarities between e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) and COVID-19 symptoms and manifestations. EVALI and COVID-19 share many symptoms
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 19 2020 When it comes to understanding why children from non-white race groups have such poor health outcomes compared with their white counterparts, it’s time for researchers to look beyond their genes and delve deeper into social factors, according to a commentary published today in the journal Pediatrics. Framing race
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 18 2020 Children born with a common genetic condition, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), are at increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) early in life. Despite long-standing national guidelines, cholesterol screening — for children at age 2 for those with a family history of heart disease and between the ages of
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 18 2020 Children in a Melbourne family developed a COVID-19 immune response after chronic exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their parents, a new case report has found. The research, led by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and published in Nature Communications, showed that despite close contact with symptomatic
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 17 2020 Younger parents were much less likely than older parents to say they planned to vaccinate their children and themselves against COVID-19, according to a research letter published online in medRxiv by authors at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 16 2020 A technology to diagnose a potentially fatal disease in premature infants invented by Sunyoung Kim, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has been granted a Breakthrough Device Designation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The noninvasive diagnostic biomarker,
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 16 2020 Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and their colleagues have determined a key factor as to why COVID-19 appears to infect and sicken adults and older people preferentially while seeming to spare younger children. Children have lower levels of an enzyme/co-receptor that SARS-CoV-2, the RNA virus that
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 16 2020 As almost any new parent will attest, the issue of infant sleep can be a nightmare. But the challenges and consequential health effects of infant sleep problems may, like so many other health disparities, disproportionately affect families of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and household socioeconomic statuses. A new study
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 9 2020 Receiving an initial antibiotic prescription for a viral acute respiratory infection–the type of infection that doesn’t respond to antibiotics–increases the likelihood that a patient or their spouse will seek care for future such infections and will receive subsequent antibiotic prescriptions, according to the findings of a study from
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A recent study published in the journal Child Abuse and Neglect has reported that the number of child maltreatment reports and child welfare interventions decreased significantly in New York City during the initial phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A reduction in child protective service investigations has also been observed. Overall, the findings
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 9 2020 Lessons on healthy feeding practices delivered to young mothers through a brief home-visiting intervention put Native American infants on a healthier growth trajectory, lowering their risks for obesity, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health at the Bloomberg School of
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